The Role of Resiliency in Responding to Blood-borne Viral and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Indigenous Communities

Date Commenced:
2005
Project Status
Ongoing
Expected Date of Completion:
2012
Project Supporters

Tripartite Cooperation Agreement between Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR); National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (NHMRC); Health Research Council of New Zealand (HRC).

Currently recruiting
No
image - Kirby Logo On White 4

About the Project

Project Collaborators: External

Townsville Aboriginal and Islanders Health Service Ltd

The Aboriginal Medical Service Coop Ltd, Redfern

Derbarl Yerrigan Health Service, Perth

Centre for Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Health Canada

Canadian Aboriginal AIDS Network

University of Ottawa

Ngã Pae o te Mãramatanga, University of Auckland

Auckland University of Technology

University of Otago Medical School

Rationale

Indigenous people remain vulnerable to blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections and this places burdens on families and communities. This study will explore how indigenous people in Australia, Canada and New Zealand protect themselves against these infections. By focusing on resilience, the project moves beyond the past emphasis on risk and disadvantage, through the conduct of research that aims to identify and implement strategies to enhance the ability of Indigenous people to avoid acquiring these infections.

Aims

With focus on adolescents and young adults in urban settings, this projects aims to:

  1. Identify factors among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people that indicate protection against acquisition of blood-borne viral and sexually transmitted infections (BBV/STI);
  2. Identify factors that enhance access to services for prevention and management of BBV/STI;
  3. Develop and assess interventions to enhance these protective factors that can be delivered through Aboriginal community-controlled health services (ACCHS).   
Design & Method

Clinical audit, community-based participatory research and cross-sectional survey.

Progress/Update

In progress.

Benefits

This project seeks to identify the factors that protect young Indigenous people against blood-borne and sexually transmitted infections, promote access to prevention and treatment and provide capacity building opportunities for Indigenous researchers and Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) partner organisations.

Output

Peer-reviewed publications, conference presentations and reports.

Other Investigators

Julie Mooney-Somers, Angie Akee, Neil Andersson, Chris Archibald, Clive Aspin, Kevin Barlow, John Daniels, Vanessa Davies, Nigel Dickson, Sandra Eades, Dulcie Flowers, Randy Jackson, Rhys Jones, Chris Lawrence, Mihi Ratima, George Sioui, Robert Scott, Beverley Shea, Maurice Shipp, Linda Smith, Edward Wilkes, Tom Wong.

Project Members
image - 1339124418 Jk2
Professor and Program Head
Ph +61 (0)2 9385 0961
image - 1340850769 Lm Work Photo
Professor and Program Head
Ph +61 (0)2 9385 0936

Project Contacts

Related Projects